“Cut the poison out of your life. No matter what - or whom - it may be.”
— Jeigo - It’s going to hurt before it gets better (via jeigo)
“He has made everything beautiful in its time. He has also set eternity in the hearts of men; yet they cannot fathom what God has done from beginning to end.”
— Ecclesiastes 3:11 (via simply-divine-creation)

(via cabin-in-thewoods)

full tank of gas, an entire day to myself. The wind blowing through my hair, ultraviolence on repeat. Driving alone on the open road, taking some well needed time for myself. Leaving everything I know behind me for just a few hours. Alone with my camera, a book and a pen. Let my mind explode on the pages, release thoughts I haven’t told anyone, and set them free. And for a moment, I felt free. (dont delete the caption)

(via cabin-in-thewoods)

“You should make yourself into what you want to be. You’re only here for a short time. And even if you get reincarnated you’re not going to remember this time now but in vague echoes. You should make yourself into what you want to be even if people around you think it’s impossible or tragedy strikes you. Tragedy striking you is the very reason to do this because life is too much bullshit to let it have it’s way with you all the time. You don’t owe angry people explanations and you don’t have to check first with people to see if what you want is legitimate. Plenty of people fail playing it extra safe and they all say the same thing, “should have done…” You can be one of those people, fine. But if you live out your life and all you have going for it are stellar employee performance reviews, just….god damn man. It’s not even your name on the building.”
— Dig Yourself (via howitzerliterarysociety)

Dis. Ditto.

(via macedonianmess)

(via everestless)

polerstuff:

blue—genes:

Camping at Blue River Reservoir this weekend. Pretty fuckin rad.

(via cabin-in-thewoods)

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Fold a piece of paper in half 103 times, and its wider than the observable universe.

this is due to exponential growth; the increase in previous thickness is doubled each time you fold the piece of paper again. physically you could probably only fold a piece of paper about 7 - 8 times on your own.

Given a paper large enough—and enough energy—you can fold it as many times as you want. If you fold it 103 times, the thickness of your paper will be larger than the observable Universe; 93 billion light-years distance.

How can a 0.0039-inch-thick paper get to be as thick as the Universe?

The answer is simple: Exponential growth. The average paper thickness in 1/10th of a millimeter (0.0039 inches.) If you perfectly fold the paper in half, you will double its thickness.

Folding the paper in half a third time will get you about the thickness of a nail.

Seven folds will be about the thickness of a notebook of 128 pages.

10 folds and the paper will be about the width of a hand.

23 folds will get you to one kilometer—3,280 feet.

30 folds will get you to space. Your paper will be now 100 kilometers high.

Keep folding it. 42 folds will get you to the Moon. With 51 you will burn in the Sun.

Now fast forward to 81 folds and your paper will be 127,786 light-years, almost as thick as the Andromeda Galaxy, estimated at 141,000 light-years across.

90 folds will make your paper 130.8 million light-years across, bigger than the Virgo Supercluster, estimated at 110 million light-years. The Virgo Supercluster contains the Local Galactic Group—with Andromeda and our own Milky Way—and about 100 other galaxy groups.

And finally, at 103 folds, you will get outside of the observable Universe, which is estimated at 93 billion light-years in diameters.

[source]

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Scientists from MIT Developed a Trillion frames per second slow motion camera that can show light moving through a bottle. Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography - For comparison, the imaging of a bullet captured at this many frames per second would last a year as explained in the presentation by Professor Ramesh Raskar of MIT.

[video]

^ what you have witnessed above is light travelling in slow motion.

further information from the MIT website